Discussion:
OS, Russia internals
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Oleg Smirnov
2017-02-28 20:47:11 UTC
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In this thread, I plan to post something about specifically internal Russian
issues with regard to how it's [misre]presented in the 'western' media and/or
misunderstood by the English-speaking public.

It is supposed to be not much debatable, but rather educational/explanatory.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-02-28 20:52:02 UTC
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<https://www.firstthings.com/article/2016/10/the-cold-war-is-over>

THE COLD WAR IS OVER

Peter Hitchens | October 2016

.. People often say silly things about other people's languages, such as
George W. Bush's rumored claim that "The problem with the French is they have
no word for entrepreneur." (The source is former British Cabinet Minister
Shirley Williams, the Baroness Williams of Crosby, who may have been being
mischievous.) But I have checked the following carefully with Russian friends,
and it is true. The usual Russian term for safety or security, bezopasnost, is
a negative word meaning "without danger" (bez = "without"; opasnost =
"danger"). The natural state of affairs is danger.

Safety, for Russians, is something to be achieved by neutralizing a danger
that is presumed to exist at all times. From this follows a particular
attitude to life and government. ..

...

Fact is that Russian 'bezopasnost' has a notably narrower usage than English
safety or security. The term is used specifically when a danger or threat or
risk is implied. To refer to a state of peace / comfort (tranquility,
confidence etc) or to protection and guards in a functional sense, there are
many other Russian words. And the English 'security' itself means 'without
pains' (se = "without"; cure = "pains") from which one can for sure conclude
that the natural state of affairs in the Latin/English life is pains.

One more thing is, you usually can't properly interpret Russian words without
comparison with other Slavic languages (it's somewhat like interpretation of
English words usually requires comparison with [old] French German and Latin).
Then you can use a machine translator and see how it translates English safety
and security to Bulgarian (bezopasnost), Czech/Slovak (bezpecnost), Polish
(bezpieczenstwo), Serbian (bezbednost). They all have it "bez/without danger",
so the natural state of affairs for all of them is danger as well.

This example shows not only striking ignorance of the writer and poor quality
of education of his 'Russian friends' with whom he 'checked it carefully'. It
also illustrates the obsessive 'western' desire to attribute to the Russians
'danger', 'suffering' and things like that. Such an attitude is essentially
racist with a low prurient flavor, it would cause simply a responsive hatred.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-03-02 03:25:57 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<https://www.firstthings.com/article/2016/10/the-cold-war-is-over>
THE COLD WAR IS OVER
Peter Hitchens | October 2016
Let me try again, starting in a Moscow street called Bolshaya Ordynka. The
existence of this place, at the end of the Soviet era, was a great shock to
me. .. The name of the thoroughfare means "The Street of the Great Horde,"
.. A few miles away, near the turbulent Taganka Theatre, is a small park, with
trees and a pond. ..

...

'Bolshaya Ordynka' doesn't mean "The Street of the Great Horde". What really
'Ordynka' means is simply 'Hordynka'. I.e. 'horde' + diminutival ('ynka',
'anka', 'unka' etc - you've got the idea). It was a road that led out from the
Moscow city in direction of the Horde. 'Bolshaya Ordynka' means Big Hordynka,
but it doesn't connote like 'the Great Horde', as the writer misinforms. It's
rather a common and widespread Russian custom to name 'paired' entities like
'big' and 'small'. If there's 'big' something than there also supposed to be
'small' something of the sort. It may be streets, villages, rivers, lakes and
other entities. For example, the Moscow Great Theatre is really great, but
when it was named 'Big Theatre' - in the 18th century - it wasn't supposed to
be really great, the name came from the fact that two theatres were built, one
'big' and one 'small'. The Moscow Maly Theatre is also really great, but its
name means 'small', - because it was built in pair with the 'big' one.

Taganka is also of Turkic origin. 'Tagan' meant a feature related to boilers.
It was an area within Moscow where those Tatars likely did something (strange,
dark and special) about those tagans.

About the same time there was also 'German quarter' in Moscow, where Russian
authorities settled people that came from West Europe and were not willing to
convert to the Orthodoxy (those who converted, became simply Russians).
'German' didn't mean German in the modern sense, until about the 18th century
all 'westerners' in Russia were 'german' ('german' literally means 'dumb' in
the Slavic languages). The Moscow German area was inhabited mostly by German,
British and Dutch people that had Protestant and Catholic churches there.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-03-02 07:13:56 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<https://www.firstthings.com/article/2016/10/the-cold-war-is-over>
THE COLD WAR IS OVER
Peter Hitchens | October 2016
Peter Hitchens is quite a prominent journalist figure in the UK. Judging by
his twitter, he's a bold, firm and keen person, English style. If he does not
know something, he can think a little and come to an acute conjecture.

Any narrator, writer is also a bit an actor who seeks to capture more public's
attention, which requires that his narratives sounded more dramatic. After
all, he needs to sell it. When it's about journalism and (more relevant to the
older times) travel reporting, such an aspiration to make it look more
dramatic is one of the main sources of various misrepresentations and myths.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-06-12 04:08:51 UTC
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<http://tinyurl.com/hfzbl32> independent.co.uk

Domestic violence reports soar in Russian city following partial
decriminalisation

Mayor of Yekaterinburg believes law change makes domestic violence seem
acceptable

Rachel Roberts | 11 February 2017

Reports of domestic violence have more than doubled in Russia's fourth
largest city since the Government reduced the punishmentfor spousal or
child abuse from a criminal to a civil one.

Police in Yekaterinburg responded to 350 incidents of domestic violence
daily since the law was relaxed compared to 150 such incidents previously,
according to the city's mayor.

Yevgeny Roizman told Russian media: "Before, people were afraid of
criminal charges - this acted as some kind of safety barrier.

...

Roizman made a short indistinct post in a social network, and the Russian
'opposition' media picked up and promoted it. A few days later, some angry
local MPs at a meeting of the regional parliament demanded from Roizman to
clarify his claim. Also they asked the regional police chief to present them
the statistics. At the meeting, Roizman said <http://tinyurl.com/n5rqrbo> in
his defense he meant clearly not the 'rise of domestic violence' as such but
just the increase in the number of police raids due to the cases [likely]
related to domestic violence. It was a sly and bogus excuse from Roizman, his
original message connoted in another way.

In turn, the increase in the police activities is, actually, what the law was
mainly intended for. I.e. to make the police more enthusiastic about such
cases. As practice shows, after family quarrels accompanied by non-serious
violence, people usually tend to put up soon. But if the police have opened a
criminal case, then they can't close it just because the figurants want to put
up. Such a situation made the police reluctant about it. Softening of the law
makes them more enthusiastic to deal with the violent family quarrels.

It would be very ridiculous to think that the wife-beaters in Yekaterinburg
carefully watched the work of the Russian parliament and started their
violence right at the day when the parliament had 'allowed' it, as the cited
article and Roizman himself suggest. It's such a kind of folks that hardly
are much interested in / aware of what's going on in the parliament. The real
explanation is that the police became more enthusiastic, and, as I said, that
is the main goal the law was introduced for.

Mr. Roizman is a controversial, sort of liberal-populist, figure in the Russia
domestic politics. He started his adult life, in the 1980s, with cheating and
robbing his girlfriends, for which the Soviet justice sent him to the gulags
for a year or two. Later he was known for his [alleged] links to the regional
criminal community. It did not prevent him from his further adventures in the
political activism. He has achieved certain success in the Yekaterinburg
region (was elected the mayor of the big city). Time to time he makes weird
and odd claims. He is also known as a poet, painter and philanthropist of the
Orthodox Church. There're also some traces of abuse of alcohol on his face.

...

According to Rossiskaya Gazeta, the Russian government's official newspaper,
between 12,000 and 14,000 women die every year in Russia as a result of
domestic violence - a figure backed up by a 2010 UN report.

...

Rossiskaya Gazeta is the Russian government's official newspaper, but it does
not mean that anything published in this newspaper is official and accurate.
What mainly makes it official is that it publishes the official texts of the
laws etc. Besides that the newspaper publishes various opinions and gives the
floor to various authors, whose claims and numbers in no way are official.
The claim that "between 12,000 and 14,000 women die every year in Russia as a
result of domestic violence" has nothing to do with reality. It was likely
once produced by a sick imagination of some 'pro-women' activists, and then it
wanders from one shoddy stinky leftist outlet to another shoddy stinky leftist
outlet. Rossiskaya Gazeta also gave the floor to the activists of the sort
that alleged such a number. Some of them promote it as a misinformation
intentionally, maybe some of them believe it's better to exaggerate the number
as much as possible in order to draw more public attention to the problem they
believe is important. Sometimes the Russian officials, heads of corresponding
departments, in order to obtain more budgets and favor for their departments,
make smartass exaggeratedly alarmist claims that do not fit to any statistics,
but the journalists pick up and promote it as allegedly official data.

...

Up to one in three Russian women is believed to suffer some form of physical
abuse at the hands of a partner, while 40 per cent of all violent crimes
and murders take place within the home, according to the Anna Centre, which
runs Russia's only domestic violence hotline.

...

This claim 'one in three' is an absolutely total nonsense, which would be
obvious for anyone who knows a little about the regular life in Russia. There
may be 'problem' families, but in no way 'one in three', which would mean it's
such a common practice. What it really means is that the shoddy stinky 'Anna
Centre' wants to claim how much important 'Anna Centre' is. This Anna Centre
is known for promotion of fake numbers <https://on.rt.com/822v>, the "14,000
women die every year" fiction was likely produced in a similar way as well.

...

A popular Russian saying is "if he beats you, it means he loves you" and
tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda carried an article after the law was passed
saying that women should be "proud of their bruises" from violent husbands
because some evolutionary psychologists claim they are more likely to give
birth to sons.

...

If you investigate those many thousands of the Russian sayings, taking them
literally, then you can find there, inter alia, advices and endorsements of
various kinds of immoral and dishonest behavior, fraud, deception etc etc.
That's because the sayings are in no way moral imperatives. Some of them may
be. A saying is, basically, just a saying, - an expressive phrase that may be
appropriate to say/repeat sometimes on occasion. It may be said ironically,
sarcastic, deliberate ambiguously and so on. I suspect it's so in any
language, although Russian is especially 'deceptive' language, which allows
much more shades of ambiguety than, say, English. Anyway, interpretation of
sayings as [necessarily] imperatives is a sign of cultural primitivism, and
that's what the shoddy stinky left really is.

This notorious "if he beats you, it means he loves you" Russian saying also
wanders from one leftist BS writing to another leftist BS writing, and each
shoddy scribbler presents it as it was an imperative. This saying might be to
some extent imperatively relevant in the past, in the densely patriarchal
society a wife might find husband's anger is better than his disinterest to
her. However, I think, even in the past it likely had an ambiguous meaning.
The saying is known, but not 'popular'. I never heard people use it often in
the everyday life. I first heard it from my grandmother when I was a child,
she said it's such a joke that an anger means at least a non-indifference.

The tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda 'carried the article' without any relation
to the law <http://clck.ru/BH5KZ>. Moreover the British scribbler was too
shy to clarify the fact the tabloid simply retold a pretty old British
scientific research (this article <http://tinyurl.com/ydh7z53w>). In order to
properly understand it one should know that a reference to 'the British
scientists' is such a kind of meme in Russia which means there's a droll BS
which may (or may not) contain elements of non-BS. When the KP staff
discovered that the British media were unable to understand their humor and
indecently used reference to their article as an alleged example of
promotion of violence, they changed it a bit and added a special disclaimer
for idiots explaining what the article is really about.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-06-12 04:14:41 UTC
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The next question is, why the shoddy stinky 'western' leftist media,
especially the Atlanticist ones are so desperately insanely jealous about
the 'domestic violence in Russia' theme.

I can see three main reasons here.

First is racism. The 'western' left declares itself anti-racist, but it's
largely a delusion and self-deception. 'The west' is genuinely racist by
its nature, and the declaratively anti-racist 'western' left isn't an
exception. They may be anti-racist only where they feel a cogent cultural
superiority. Where they can't feel it they resort to racist stereotyping.
Of course, in this way they produce hatred, including the legitimate and
justified Russian hatred against 'the west'. And you know we can nuke you.

A cultist / political demand. The cultists need to far-fetch the reality
to fit their theories and political agenda. As the 'western' shoddy stinky
leftists have demonized the 'regime' in Russia they need to have the things
that must be - according to their cultist theories - naturally attributed
to such a tyranny. The fact that in the 'democratic' 1990s Russia was much
more criminal and violent than it's now causes a great pain in the stinky
leftist asses because according to their theories the 'macho Putin regime'
must be 'decivilizing', it has to produce a culture of domestic violence
and like that. If it does not then it means the authorities in Russia hide
something. The Atlanticist funds lavishly support various 'theoretical
criminology' etc 'researches' intended to prove that the official Russian
statistics is a carefully fabricated fiction. Then, the question is, why,
if the regime is really such a tyranny, the official government newspaper
is allowed to publish the alarmist BS? Of course, nobody of the stinky left
would want to explain such inconsistencies in their obsession with Russia.

The third reason is pornography. If you think about the domestic violence
sanely, then you understand that the main issue may be about children, not
women. Children are more defenseless, to a child subjected to a violence
in the family, it's much more difficult to complain coherently to someone.
Women are adults. In the case of an intolerable situation in the family, a
woman can easily divorce. In the ancient times women were limited in their
rights, today it's not the case but rather the opposite. (There are a few
specific regions where the archaic-like patriarchal mores still exist,
mainly the North Caucasus and some others. The Kremlin pursues delicate
policies towards such regions because a common Russian custom is to respect
for regional local customs in Russia.) In general, the Russians laws (and I
suspect not only Russian ones), when it comes to the family-related issues,
are more favorable to women rather than to men. There is no reason that
would force a married woman to tolerate / forgive the family violence
if it really harts her. Meanwhile, the 'domestic violence' activists and
the stinky leftist media pay quite a little attention to children, but their
main focus and righteous pathos is mainly on women, and they present it in
such a tune as if the women were bandaged and locked in a cage without exit.
The answer is - pornography. When you read and use your imagination about
the domestic violence in Russia, this is essentially the same as if you
were reading a pornographic BDSM story. The shoddy stinky leftist media love
this subject because it allows them to publish pornographic stuff attracting
the readers under the 'decent' guise of caring for domestic violence victims.
Just look at the illustrations to the articles like this http://u.to/Uzv9Dw
or this http://u.to/aTv9Dw , - they are essentially a soft-porn BDSM-style.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-06-12 04:17:05 UTC
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<http://tinyurl.com/hs3hbu5> grantthornton.global

Women in business 2017

Grant Thornton | 08 Mar 2017

Download it <http://clck.ru/AhyTk>

According to this Women in Business rating, Russia is the absolute 'world
leader' in "percentage of women in senior management" in the recent years,
where 47% of senior roles are held by women (vs 25% world average), in 2017.

How it's possible if the Russian women are so downtrodden and oppressed by
the domestic violence? It's elementary my dear watson. The domestic beating
makes them stronger and teaches them to be capable to a senior management.

Some data from the report.

North America
23% of senior roles are held by women;
31% of businesses have no women in senior roles.

European Union
26% of senior roles are held by women;
36% of businesses have no women in senior roles.

Eastern Europe
38% of senior roles are held by women;
9% of businesses have no women in senior roles.

In Eastern Europe, Russia is "in the lead as the only country in which every
business has a woman on its senior leadership team." (really, it's an insult
to Russia to say it's in East Europe, - Russia is Russia, not in any Europe).

In 2015 <http://clck.ru/AhyuE>, these 'Grant Thornton' brought a picture of
the [fragmentary] global rating <http://clck.ru/Ahywe>, from which it looks
like Russia together with Poland-Baltics and the Transcaucasian countries of
Christian background - Georgia, Armenia - form a cluster of similar patterns
with regard to the women's involvement in the management.
Oleg Smirnov
2017-06-12 21:17:55 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
<http://tinyurl.com/hs3hbu5> grantthornton.global
Women in business 2017
Grant Thornton | 08 Mar 2017
Download it <http://clck.ru/AhyTk>
According to this Women in Business rating, Russia is the absolute 'world
leader' in "percentage of women in senior management" in the recent years,
where 47% of senior roles are held by women (vs 25% world average), in 2017.
How it's possible if the Russian women are so downtrodden and oppressed by
the domestic violence? It's elementary my dear watson. The domestic beating
makes them stronger and teaches them to be capable to a senior management.
Some data from the report.
North America
23% of senior roles are held by women;
31% of businesses have no women in senior roles.
European Union
26% of senior roles are held by women;
36% of businesses have no women in senior roles.
Eastern Europe
38% of senior roles are held by women;
9% of businesses have no women in senior roles.
In Eastern Europe, Russia is "in the lead as the only country in which every
business has a woman on its senior leadership team." (really, it's an insult
to Russia to say it's in East Europe, - Russia is Russia, not in any Europe).
Perhaps, this can explain why the 'western'-style feminism is unwelcome in
Russia. This is because the 'western' feminism is much more about declaration
and manifestation rather than about the prose of the real life. What they
really need is to show off, to demonstrate something 'progressive', to claim
something boldly and loudly, to produce noise and excitation / irritation.

It's a kind of compensation for the underrepresentation in the management.

Meanwhile, Russia's women can take their niche in the management and social
hierarchy without much noise and manifestation, also without all those bold
'progressive' 'western' claims, a large part of which are pretty stupid and
can not be supported neither by a relevant science nor by the common sense.
This is why the attempts of some specific groups to simulate the 'western'-
style feminism in Russia result in a pathetic tasteless profanation/clownery.
They can somehow simulate a form, but they can not find enough substance
for their activism. Thus they have to over-exaggerate some issues and invent
non-existing issues / promote lies in order to justify their 'mission'.
Dan S. MacAbre
2017-02-28 21:04:14 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
In this thread, I plan to post something about specifically internal Russian
issues with regard to how it's [misre]presented in the 'western' media and/or
misunderstood by the English-speaking public.
It is supposed to be not much debatable, but rather
educational/explanatory.
Everything is misrepresented to everyone, everywhere. We're slowly
learning that. Are you?
Oleg Smirnov
2017-02-28 22:57:07 UTC
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Post by Oleg Smirnov
In this thread, I plan to post something about specifically internal
Russian issues with regard to how it's [misre]presented in the 'western'
media and/or misunderstood by the English-speaking public.
It is supposed to be not much debatable, but rather
educational/explanatory.
Everything is misrepresented to everyone, everywhere. We're slowly learning
that. Are you?
Good for you.

'We' are helping.
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